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Tony Rosenthal, Alamo

There’s no basement in this Alamo either. Seminal Cor-ten steel artist Tony Rosenthal’s public sculptures dot Manhattan. Like most public art of the era (late 60s/early 70s), the minimalist designs can sometimes go unnoticed, their industrial design being swallowed by the concrete of the city.  The exception to this rule being “Alamo,” which is most commonly known as “The Astor Place Cube.”

The cube, an East Village monument since 1967 (with a brief removal for restoration), acts as the gateway to the once bohemian/Warhol hang out then punk rock street of St. Marks (before all the noodle places took over). “Alamo” has seen the intersection change drastically, from being the center of bohemia, to the addition of K-Mart and Starbucks, to the new slick and controversial glass high rise, all the while engaging the public who sit under it, skate around it, tag it and sometimes move it (it rotates).

Who: Tony Rosenthal

What: Alamo

Where: Astor Place, Lafayette at 8th Street

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2 Responses to “Tony Rosenthal, Alamo”
  1. There’s no basement at the Alamo! Tony Rosenthal, Alamo http://t.co/hAZvetUI via @artnerdnewyork

  2. Do you think people more people visit the Alamo because of @peeweeherman rather than their love of history? http://t.co/pLPkl3iU

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