Art Nerd New York | Los Angeles

Alice Aycock : Paper Chase

Carve out some time in your schedule to check out Alice Aycock’s sculptures on Park Ave, between 52nd and 66th. The fluidity of Aycock’s work can be seen from every angle, forcing the viewer to slow down despite the bustling surroundings. The sculptures thoughtfully, playfully engage those who stop and pay attention.

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Alice Aycock: Paper Chase
Park Avenue 2014

“Much of my work in both the public and private spheres has been a meditation on the philosophical ramifications of technology
from the simplest tool (the arrowhead and the plow) to the computer. Many of these works have incorporated images of wheels
and turbines and references to energy in the form of spirals, whirlwinds, whirlpools, spinning tops, whirly-gigs, and so on.

For the Park Avenue project I tried to visualize the movement of wind energy as it flowed up and down the Avenue creating
random whirlpools, touching down here and there and sometimes forming dynamic three-dimensional massing of forms. The
sculptural assemblages suggest waves, wind turbulence, turbines, and vortexes of energy. One of the works, in particular,
references the expressive quality of wind through drapery and the chaotic beauty of fluid/flow dynamics. As much as the
sculptures are obviously placed on the mall, I wanted the work to have a random, haphazard quality – in some cases, piling up
on itself, in others spinning off into the air. Much of the energy of the city is invisible. It is the energy of thought and ideas colliding
and being transmitted outward. The works are the metaphorical visual residue of the energy of New York City. The pieces also
have a reference to the practice of making cutout paper models of visual ideas in architecture and sculpture dating back to
Russian Constructivism.

The concept I developed for Park Avenue is constructed of painted structural and sheet aluminum and fiberglass. The six
sculpture proposals can be read from both sides of the avenue and the visual narrative plays to both the uptown and downtown
movement of traffic patterns.”

 

 

 

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